Once again, Lemon, I leave your office more confused than when I entered but having glimpsed yet another tile in the rich mosaic that is your menstrual history.
— Jack Donaghy (30 Rock)
floralls:

violet (by clarecita1)

floralls:

violet (by clarecita1)

Reblogged from floralls
My high school Spanish teacher posted this on Pinterest in her board of things to use for class. I have a sneaking suspicion it’s more about dat a$$ than the cultural component.

My high school Spanish teacher posted this on Pinterest in her board of things to use for class. I have a sneaking suspicion it’s more about dat a$$ than the cultural component.

posthawk:

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

Reblogged from Kooky Chow

Audrey Hepburn photographed by Pierluigi Praturlon at the Cinecittà Studios during a break in filming War and Peace in Rome, 1955.

Audrey Hepburn photographed by Pierluigi Praturlon at the Cinecittà Studios during a break in filming War and Peace in Rome, 1955.

Reblogged from Rare Audrey Hepburn

elizabethtinafeys:

"Does your mom want to take pictures?"

"Uh yes, she does."

Reblogged from Blorft.
Never trust your tongue when your heart is bitter.
— Samuel J.  (via imnotchaste)
Reblogged from Dovely
Even before it became officially so in the United States, April has long been the poet’s month. “April” (or “Aprill”) is the third word of one of the first great poems in the English language, The Canterbury Tales, and the first word in The Waste Land, which does its best to feel like the last great English poem. April — “spungy,” “proud-pied,” and “well-apparel’d” April — is also the most-mentioned month in Shakespeare, along with its springtime neighbor May, and it has given a poetic subject to Dickinson, Larkin, Plath, Glück, and countless others. Why? Do we like its promise of rebirth, its green and messy fecundity? Its hopefulness is easy to celebrate — and easy to cruelly undercut, if you’re T.S. Eliot rooting his lilies in the wasteland of death.
Reblogged from Millions Millions